An Analysis of Charitable Causes that Americans Care About

charity-theories

Here’s an interesting analysis by Simone Collins (Huffington Post) about the different charitable causes that Americans care about.

In this era where modern technology has the capability to track the personal activities and interests of a person, it is now possible to understand the different values at a certain level of accuracy which would seem rather impossible before.

In Social Media, there are different analysis and reports of what type of users visit profile pages along with their interests – and most possibly, the different charitable interests that people want.

Simone Collins used Facebook’s advertising tool in his theory which can target audiences based on their characteristics and interests.

Below are the estimated audience size numbers that Simone Collins collected using Facebook’s advertising tool:

Here are the estimated audience size numbers I collected over the weekend:
42,000,000: People who are interested in donating to charitable causes (in general)
40,000,000: People in households that donate money to political causes
26,000,000: People who are interested in donating to veteran causes
19,400,000: People in households that donate money to health causes
10,200,000: People in households that donate money to environmental or wildlife causes
9,800,000: People in households that donate money to animal welfare
5,600,000: People who have an interest in making donations to cancer causes
5,000,000: People who have an interest in making donations to children’s causes
4,000,000: People who are interested in donating to religious causes
1,800,000: People who are interested in donating to world relief causes
960,000: People in households that donate money to arts or cultural causes

So, what do these numbers suggest?

According to Simone Collins, politics has a big role in charitable decision making since about 95% of the people who may be interested in donating are at most interested with political causes. Although this is perhaps simply because “politicians are the most effective at leveraging the expertise of sophisticated, number-crunching, fundraising specialists when reaching out to audiences via social media.”

According to the numbers, the charitable causes that generated the more attention are those that relate to veterans and health. Simone theorized that “…veterans’ charities and charities related to health enjoy interest not only from donors, but also recipients of those charities’ support…”

Facebook users’ charitable interests also support animal welfare, environmental protection and wildlife causes which dominate over religious and cultural causes. Simone theorizes that this is most probably due to the rise of non-religious Americans in the United States “…so it seems fairly clear that religion is less important now than it was in the past…”

Simone’s point of views are rather interesting, especially that he pointed out the fact that politics take up the majority role in social media – with this influence, people are more inclined to support charitable causes related to politics. Or the fact that religious causes are not much of a priority by Americans in this day and age.

What do you think?

Share your theories with us at Twitter: https://twitter.com/deoscloset

browse1

Email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>